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Voice Of The People

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MAY 22 - NATION, NOT STATE

The article by Sujeev Shakya ('Modi-fying relations,' May 20, Page 6) contains interesting analysis on the Indian elections. However, Shakya writes about Nepal suffering because of the fragmentation in Bihar and UP. The recent elections were held for India's parliament, not for state legislatures. UP's Chief Minister continues to be Samajbadi Party's Akhilesh Yadav and Bihar's will soon emerge from the JD (U). Although BJP did extremely well for seats in the Indian Parliament from these two states, state-wide stability will only come if a single political party or coalition sweeps the state-level elections, which will not be held for few more years.

Prakash A Raj, Kathmandu

HOLY RETHINKING

It is time to restore the ancient sanctity of the temple of Pasupatinath by appointing priests from Nepal's non-Brahmin families ('Special worships at Pashupatinath Temple halted due to priests' protest ,' May 16, Page _"). Manakamana Temple of Gorkha has a Magar Priest but this has not diminished its popularity. Krishna enjoyed eating at the house of a Sarki devotee, so a Sarki priest is not unthinkable. The Pashupati Area Development Trust should stop commercialisation of the sacred temple and arrange for young students from Sarki families to study Vedas and all the ancient ways of worship. The lord would love the ancient holy manners, not the money-centred commercialisation of the temple.

Ravi Manandhar, Kathmandu

ALIEN IN OWN HOME

After reading an immigration article by Amar B Shrestha, I would like to explain my alienation from this country ('Goodbye, motherland,' May 16, Page 6). While visiting the local ward office to file an application for minor paperwork, I wrote the application in the local language, as permitted by the constitution. However, I had to endure taunts that "Nobody understands the language," although many officials present spoke it fluently. I came away feeling humiliated and like an alien in my own neighbourhood.

GG Shrestha, Kathmandu

CHITWAN TRAUMA

On May 15th, at the Evergreen Lodge in Sauraha, the owner informed me that a few men had arrived to kill the area's stray dogs. I saw dogs run toward the river, including one which began having seizures upon return. It died a slow and painful death as her owner lay next to her in tears. Witnessing this as a tourist disheartened me. It continues to haunt and influence my memories of Chitwan National Park, which aims to protect wildlife. As a dog lover, it will be hard for me to recommend coming here when someone else might witness something similar. Dogs may not be wildlife but they are animals and merit similar protection. I have never felt threatened by any dogs in Sauraha. Sterilising them to prevent reproduction is preferable to poisoning them. More tourists would come if such a programme were implemented. Without this change, I will certainly never return to Sauraha.

Daniel Faiell, New York, the US

The poisoning of nearly 40 dogs in Sauraha has been a traumatising experience for me. Last Thursday, I was sleeping in the garden of my hotel with a dog called Julie. I'd known her for three and a half months and loved her very much. Ten minutes after I left, the hotel owner called to say that Julie was dying because she had eaten meat laced with poison. I quickly ran over but it was too late: Julie was already dead. She had found and eaten a piece of poisoned meat on the riverside. Later, a tractor came and collected Julie's dead body. I stopped it and found more than 20 dead dogs in the back. On Friday, I saw people openly distribute poisoned meat in front of tourists at the riverside. That day, many foreigners saw dogs die a terrible death and felt deeply upset. We organised a memorial on the riverbank that evening to pray for the souls of the dogs. All I have left now is a picture of me sleeping with Julie, taken ten minutes before she died. I appeal to the authorities to prevent this from happening ever again. There are humane alternatives to managing the stray dog population, many of which have already been introduced in Sauraha.

Andrin, Switzerland

Posted on: 2014-05-23 08:53


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